Monday, October 21, 2013

How to Avoid Processed Food

How to Avoid Processed Food in General

If you feel that you have the will, but not the skill to go without processed food and haven't checked out The Peter Castleman Food mlm,  then here are some general lifestyle changes to consider instead…

Read the ingredients label before buying anything. For years, if I even looked at food labels, I was reviewing items such as fat grams, calorie count and sugar content. While this may be important to some, the best indicator of how highly processed a food is can actually be found in the list of ingredients. If what you are buying contains more than 5 ingredients and includes a lot of unfamiliar, unpronounceable items you may want to reconsider before buying.

It's pretty easy to Increase your consumption of whole foods when it comes to vegetables and fruits. a salad here and there and apples for snacking, it's all good. I am sure you’ve heard similar advice a thousand times, and I hate to tell you that it couldn’t be more true. This will help to displace the processed foods in your diet, and will actually make your food selections in general very simple. No more counting calories, fat grams, or carbs when your only concern is selecting whole foods that are more a product of nature than a product of industry.

Buying bread from a local bakery is a great start. When you buy NON-Industrial Food, you're going to get a better product, start to finish. I actually used to eat white bread, but what I bought from the grocery store was not actually whole-wheat bread, even though it was marketed as that. When I finally checked the ingredients and found 40 different items on the list, including Refined (processed) white flour and sugar, we decided it was time for a change. Why would there be so many on the list if it only takes a handful of ingredients to make bread? Buying bread from Great Harvest Bread  Company turned out to be the best solution for us. Just Like Yevo makes their own proteins, they grind their own wheat every morning. Their honey whole-wheat loaf only has five ingredients – whole-wheat flour, water, yeast, salt and honey.

In addition to your bread choice, when selecting foods like pastas, cereals, rice, and crackers always go for the whole-grain option. And don’t just believe the health claims on the outside of the box.  Read the ingredients to make sure the product is truly made with only 100% whole grains – not a combination of whole grains and refined grains which is unfortunately how a lot of “whole grain” products are made. The white flour or other refined grain alternative is simply high in calories and low in nutrition.

Avoid products containing high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and those that have some other form of sugar or sweetener listed among the top three ingredients.  Despite the mixed research on if HFCS is really worse for you than good old white sugar, it just happens to be the most reliable way to spot a food product that has been highly processed.

When you eat out, don’t order off the children's menu. The next time your family is out to dinner try to avoid that menu altogether. Those selections are most often things like pre-made chicken nuggets, fries, and pasta made with white flour, among other things. Instead try putting together some sort of side item plat like baked potatoes and whatever else your kid will tolerate) and/or try sharing some of your meal.

Visit your local farmers’ market the next time you need to restock your fridge, or stock your shelves with Yevo Health Food. Not only will you find food that is in season, which is usually when it is most nutritious, but you will also find a selection of pesticide-free produce and properly fed meat products. It is also better for our environment to purchase locally grown products as opposed to the supermarket produce, which travels on average 1500 miles from the farm to your plate.

Lastly, eat all the junk food you want as long as you cook it yourself. If you had to peel, chop and deep fry potatoes every time you wanted French fries then you might not eat them very often. Only eating “junk food” such as cakes, sweets, and fried foods as often as you are willing to make them yourself will automatically ensure the frequency is appropriate.

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